Gardner To Work With Kevin Long This Offeason

Discussion in 'Yankees Page' started by Daniel Burch, Nov 15, 2011.

  1. Daniel Burch

    Daniel Burch TheGreedyPinstripes

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    Brett Gardner plans to begin baseball workouts soon after Thanksgiving, and his focus will be on improving his timing at the plate. Gardner’s already planning a January training session with hitting coach Kevin Long.
    “I’m either going to go out to Arizona (to Long’s home) or he’s going to come to South Carolina,” Gardner told Newsday. “Or I might actually meet him down in Miami and work out with him and Alex (Rodriguez) and a couple other guy. I’m excited to do a little work and maybe make a few adjustments with him.”
    Erik Boland talked to Gardner this morning at P.S. 130 Elementary in the Bronx, where the Yankees left fielder was reading to kids. Gardner said that he believes inconsistent timing at the plate is what led to inconsistent results in the box score this season.
    “Without good timing, you don’t really have anything,” Gardner said. “It doesn’t matter how good your mechanics are.”
    lohud
     
  2. Daniel Burch

    Daniel Burch TheGreedyPinstripes

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    Can you say "2 thumbs up"
     
  3. This is absolutely great news... Gardy already has lethal defense, speed, base running ability. If he can start to become more of a productive hitter and truly take claim to be a true MLB lead off hitter... skies the limit for this kid.
     
  4. JMaest

    JMaest Member

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    He needs to be a .300 hitter to be successful. This can only help. The Alliance approves Gardner working with Long.
     
  5. ^ I would love for him to be a .300 hitter...but i would take anything from a .280 or above. I don't buy the notion that in order for him to be successful he has to hit .300. Many yankees proved that notion wrong this season. This is a big season for gardy's future here in my opinion. He is going to have to show signs of progression and the ability to hit for average.
     
  6. JMaest

    JMaest Member

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    Which Yankee proved that, exactly?

    Granderson is the only viable name you can mention that didn't bat close to .300 and had a successful season.
     
  7. What are you using to determine a " successful season"? Some players on the yankees had down years for the yankees in regards to career numbers but still put up nice productive numbers. Swish had 23 homers, 85 rbi's for us, tex had 39 homers, 111 rbi's. Not to mention the quality defense swish played, and the gold glove defense tex always gives us. So, counting grandy and the two i named above... thats 1/3 of our lineup that put up very good numbers and gave us great defense that didn't come close to hitting that .300 mark. Obviously i would like to see all of these guys get their batting average way up and hit for average... but to say none of them had " successful season" because they didn't hit .300 is simply untrue. Most other teams in baseball would kill for players to be that productive for them. Just because they play for the yankees and had down years, and didn't live up to the hype, does not mean they didn't have successful seasons.
     
  8. JMaest

    JMaest Member

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    You're discounting Batting Average which makes no actual sense. Put it in perspective:

    Tex put up nice power numbers and all that BUT those power numbers are already included in his Batting Average. RBI's are a cumulative stat, which mean very little because he's had way more opportunities than most other players therefore he'll have higher sum totals.

    What I care more about is success rates and Tex drove in an RBI in just over 20% of his opportunities to do so. I think we all want better than that for our money.

    Bottom line, 24% of the time Tex stepped to the plate he did something productive. By no measurement I'm aware of does that qualify as "good". Just because he hit some home runs in there doesn't mean he's still not failing about 5% of the time more than he should--in baseball that 5% is a pretty big number.

    So that makes the real question: "What are YOU using to determine a "successful season"?

    Remember, I'm not saying *ALL* the Yankees have to be .300 hitters, I'm saying that Gardner *should* be very close to .300 in order to be successful. What Granderson, Cano, ARod, or Tex do is irrelevant since Gardner is not the same type of player they are. He's not the same type of player Swisher or Martin is either. He's not even a Jeter type, but that's the closest he comes to in our line-up.

    Hell, if Gardner is going to turn into a 30+ Home Run hitter, then I'll back off the .300 hitter stance. Until that happens, I'll stick with my opinion...
     
  9. Daniel Burch

    Daniel Burch TheGreedyPinstripes

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    Id rather see Gardner get the green light on the base paths , learn some plate selection, maybe some aggression so he isnt 0-2 every single at bat, and learn to bunt and Id be happy... .300 hitter or not
     
  10. JMaest

    JMaest Member

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    If he does what you said, then he'll be closer to a .300 hitter. Kind of like a "catch 22".
     
  11. Daniel Burch

    Daniel Burch TheGreedyPinstripes

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    Not necessarily. Bunts dont count towards your average except for in the negative side in most cases. Plate selection doesnt mean average... See Jason Giambi, Nick Swisher, etc. Aggressive doesnt mean .300 hitter either, see Jeter in the leadoff role. If he was aggressive the other 3 or 4 at bats as he is on the first at bat Id say he would be a .250 ish hitter. Steals are steals.

    In a perfect world, sure, it helps the average. He has the speed to leg out a lot of those bunts for singles. With a guy like Gardner I personally would pay more attention to a stat like RC (runs created) rather then BA. Especially hitting 9th in the lineup.
     
  12. JMaest

    JMaest Member

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    To be clear, the entire premise of my post(s) is based around Gardner working with Long in order to improve enough to bat lead-off.

    IMO, if he doesn't improve his average he'll still bat ninth and therefore wouldn't have changed from 2011.
     
  13. Tommy88

    Tommy88 Well-Known Member

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    Give me a batting average of .275+ along with an OBP of .365+ and I'd be thrilled.
     
  14. JMaest

    JMaest Member

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    I'd take that. But that's significantly better than .259/.345.
     
  15. jobathebeast3.0

    jobathebeast3.0 Member

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    But he put up .277/.383 the year before.

    The way I see, it all comes down to whether (sorry guys) Garnder is a .340 BABIP or .303 BABIP guy. His rates were very similar the last two years, but his BABIPs were wildly different. Now, speedsters usually have much higher ones than the rest of the league, but it remains to be seen if the same is for Gardner.
     
  16. JMaest

    JMaest Member

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    ^ Blah, blah, blah, blah.

    I want the guy who had the relaxed, controlled approach during the post-season. Give me that guy and we'll get an improved player.
     
  17. F YOUK

    F YOUK DSP Regular

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    Is it his timing that needs tweaking or his eyes? I have always thought Gardner was a guess hitter and doesn't swing at what he see's. You can't time just looking at a belt high fastball down the middle of the plate. Start swinging at it, regardless of the count and Brett will ascend to the next level.
     
  18. JMaest

    JMaest Member

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    ^ Here's my take on that:

    I believe Gardner was a dead pull hitter in the minors and was converted to a slap hitter in the pro's. That loop in his swing, IMO, is a result of him trying to go the other way. We've all seen Gardner size up a pitch and rip doubles, even short home runs, down the right field line.

    I believe he's become somewhat of a guess hitter because of this, which favors your point. He always seems to be trying too hard to hit the ball to the left side of the field. I believe that this is as a result of him changing his approach at the plate. During the post-season he really just let his bat fly and was successful.

    Obviously I don't expect Gardner to turn into a .400 hitter but I do think he can loosen up a bit and improve significantly.
     

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